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Eastmain, Nemaska and Neoskweskau

Revillon Frères Trading Company arrived in the James Bay area in the early twentieth century, forcing the HBC to improve its terms of trade and to reopen at Nemaska and Neoskweskau, traditional Cree summer gathering places. As a result, many inlanders switched from Rupert House to Eastmain, Nemaska and Neoskweskau.

Conditions were good: Game was abundant, the price of fur was high and summer jobs were plentiful.

William Wapachee, who  ministered to the people  of Nemaska, Neoskweskau  and Waswanipi in the early  twentieth century.

William Wapachee, who ministered to the people of Nemaska, Neoskweskau and Waswanipi in the early twentieth century.

Girls in front of the HBC  post at Eastmain, 1908,  where the HBC increased  advances to hunters to  attract them away from  Revillon Frères.

Girls in front of the HBC post at Eastmain, 1908, where the HBC increased advances to hunters to attract them away from Revillon Frères.

Luke and Jane Mettaweskum,  in the 1920s, at Nemaska  where the population had  more than tripled between  1911 and 1924.

Luke and Jane Mettaweskum, in the 1920s, at Nemaska where the population had more than tripled between 1911 and 1924.

Furs in trading post, Rupert House. In 1924, a silver fox at Rupert House fetched $99.57  compared to 20.00 at Nemaska, where  competition between trading companies  was more intense.

Furs in trading post, Rupert House. In 1924, a silver fox at Rupert House fetched $99.57 compared to $120.00 at Nemaska, where competition between trading companies was more intense.