Share/Save

Pottery

Some Cree ancestors used pottery as containers for cooking and storage. While relatively rare, pottery was found in six sites in the Eastmain-1 area. Our nomadic ancestors, however, probably preferred skin and bark containers, which are lighter and less fragile, but they have not survived due to the acid soils.

Two main types of pottery were found: The oldest dates to between AD 400 and 1000. The other, which dates to between AD 1300 and 1600, resembles types of pottery common on Huron-Wendat sites in southern Ontario, suggesting close contact between the Huron and ancestors of the Crees.

The oldest pots were made from rolled clay  strips that were coiled into a conical shape then  decorated with wavy lines.

The oldest pots were made from rolled clay strips that were coiled into a conical shape then decorated with wavy lines.

The more recent, globular-shaped pots were probably  made using a paddle and were decorated with  incised lines.

The more recent, globular-shaped pots were probably made using a paddle and were decorated with incised lines.

The oldest pots were made from rolled clay  strips that were coiled into a conical shape then  decorated with wavy lines.

The oldest pots were made from rolled clay strips that were coiled into a conical shape then decorated with wavy lines.

The more recent, globular-shaped pots were probably  made using a paddle and were decorated with  incised lines.

The more recent, globular-shaped pots were probably made using a paddle and were decorated with incised lines.

Sherds of pottery made between AD 400 and 1000.

Sherds of pottery made between AD 1300 and 1600.